Stop Your Dog from Jumping Up

In order to get your dog to stop this behavior you have to stop rewarding it. What do pet owners usually do when the dog jumps up? Usually they look at the dog and say something like “OK, Rover, OK, down, down, OK, good dog, go away now, enough, OK…” and may even pet the dog during the episode. All this attention is PURE REWARD to the dog, and only encourages the jumping up behavior. What needs to be done is the withdrawal of all attention. When the dog jumps up, quickly turn away from the dog, fold your arms, make no eye contact and say nothing. Once the dog has settled down THEN give it loads of attention and serious petting. The dog will need to learn this with every family member and everyone should act the same way to be consistent.

Once the dog learns that jumping up gets it NOTHING, the behavior should lessen or stop. Often the combined use of the sit command to refocus the dog’s attention is a great way to speed the whole process. As the dog is calming down, give the sit command and reward the dog for the good sit. This is especially good when you are on walks and the dog encounters a human it wants to greet. Just before it gets excited, give the sit command, then reward the dog with food, petting, toys, etc. Get the human to come down to the dog’s level and greet the dog that way. A dog that is busy sitting can’t jump up if it’s on a leash.

Problem Barking

The sound of a dog’s bark is a common and not all together unexpected sound in neighborhoods, apartment complexes and anywhere people live among each other.  Barking is a means of communication, but when it reaches an excess in both pitch and frequency, the potential for conflict between neighbors grows. 

Barking is a symptom of something deeper and in order to find a solution, the reason behind the barking needs to be determined.

Lack of Exercise

If a dog is not exercised sufficiently on a daily basis, the extra energy may be released through barking.  For example, the dog learns that he gets a quick walk in the morning, and then is left inside, full of pent up energy with nothing to do and no one to do it with. The act of continuous barking releases the energy, eventually he gets tired and is able to sleep or remain in a calm state for a few hours.

  • Before leaving your dog for any period of time in which he will bark, take him on a walk, play a game of fetch or any activity that will burn off all excess energy.  A tired dog has stands a much better chance of being a quiet dog.  The key in knowing that your dog has received enough exercise is to be able to physically see your dog is tired.
  • Sometimes physical exercise is not enough to keep a dog quiet.  Many dogs, sporting and herding breeds, were bred for a specific purpose and need a “job” to keep them busy.  Mental exercise is just as important and can be found in the form of items which are safe to chew on in your absence. For example, a Kong Toy may be “stuffed” with the dog’s food, hard dog biscuits and then topped off with peanut butter, low sodium is best.

             Your veterinarian is a good source for safe chewing alternatives.

Boredom

  • Enroll in an obedience or agility class.
  • Play on a regular basis.
  • Plan daily activities-Include the dog on runs to the bank, go to the park, rotate his toys every week so they stay “new”.
  • Make time for your dog every day.

Barking for Attention

Barking becomes a way to receive attention and negative attention is better than none. 

  • Do not give your dog attention if he is being pushy-barking, whining or pawing at you; wait until he is calm so that he understands calm behavior gets attention.
  • When he is calm, give a command such as “sit”, and give him a couple of pets and move away.
  • If the dog does not calm down within a few seconds or the barking becomes more intense, give a one word command, such as Hush! in a firm tone and command a “sit”.
  • If the barking has become habit or the dog does not take you seriously, the use of a startle tactic may be necessary to stop the behavior.  The most commonly used and effective means of this type of correction would be a small spray bottle of water, a sealed metal can full of pennies or a loud whistle.  The object used must be small enough to avoid being seen by the dog for the startle element to be effective.
  • When the dog begins to bark, give your one word command and then follow immediately with a stream of water, a loud shake of the can or a loud blow of the whistle.  This should capture the dog’s attention and stop the barking.  When the barking stops, call the dog, command a sit, praise lightly and walk away.
  • Continue practicing until the dog stops barking for attention and respects your one word command without the use of a startle tactic.

Being Territorial or Protective

If a dog has been encouraged to react to strangers, animals and noises outside, he is being taught to respond to those sounds regardless if anyone is home.  The barking becomes problematic when there isn’t anyone around to tell him to stop and in many cases, the dog is more “on guard” when left alone.  A dog’s perception of a “trespasser” can be anyone who is not supposed to be there.

  • When you are home, allow the dog to bark several times, then tell him “Quiet” and call him over to you and ask him to sit and then reward.  If the barking continues, remove the dog from the room and stay with him until he is quiet.  Repeat this procedure until the dog learns not to bark past the initial “free barks”.
  • Do not allow him to decide who gets to come in the house, rush the front door or jump on anyone entering or be pushy for attention.
  • Have a door strategy when guests or repair people arrive, place the dog in a sit stay or put him in an area away from the door and keep him on a leash if the dog’s obedience is still a work in progress.
  • The dog is greeted last and is not acknowledged at all until he is calm and under control.
  • When he is calm, have the guest give the dog a treat, so the dog will eventually learn that people in his house are a good experience.
  • Repeat this procedure until the dog is well behaved and confident around guests and anyone in your home.
  • Do not encourage barking at outside noises, for example, saying “who is that?” or “get’em!”
  • If your dog’s body posture is stiff, tail and ears are erect and he will not settle down or relax his body, and ignores any attempt of control, consult a professional.  This is an example of a dog with more serious issues.

Fearful Barking

A dog that barks at thunderstorms, firecrackers, loud noises or construction equipment is a fear barker.  A fearful dog will have his tail tucked under; ears back, and may be crouched low to the ground, freeze in one spot or have frantic movements, like he is trying to escape.

  • Move the dog away from outside stimulus-in inner room or basement, draw the blinds, and block doors and windows from view.
  • Leave a radio or television on to help drown out any frightening noises.
  • Do not soothe or comfort your dog when he is frightened by petting or saying, “it’s ok, sh”, the tone of voice being used sounds like praise and you are inadvertently teaching him to act fearful.
  • Seek professional help to help desensitize your dog and build confidence.

Separation Anxiety

The anxious dog will begin barking when you leave or briefly afterwards, the dog displays a deep attachment to you by following you from room to room, greets you in a frenzied fashion and seems anxious when your are about to leave.  A dog suffering from separation anxiety will always bark, regardless of how long you are gone.  The problem can become worse if there has been a change in the dog’s life, a move, a new roommate or pet, being left alone for a longer period, the loss of a family member or if the dog pet has recently been adopted from an animal shelter.

  • Provide the dog with structure and consistency in his daily routine.  This will allow the dog to become familiar with what to expect and give him less things to worry about.
  • Teach him simple obedience commands, for example, sit and down stay to build his confidence and allow him to receive rewards when he is “away” from you.
  • Do not make a big deal out of leaving or coming home.  When it is time to leave, walk out of the door in a matter of fact manner and ignore the dog for a few minutes when arriving home.  This will allow the dog time to calm down and then receive attention when he has settled.
  • When you are not leaving, practice the triggers that cause the dog to become anxious and anticipate leaving, for example, putting on a coat or shoes or picking up a purse, briefcase or keys.  Pick up the keys and hold them until the dog is calm, do not say anything to the dog, when he is calm, put the keys down and move on to a common activity, reading a book or watching television.  Repeat this exercise daily until the dog can remain calm and watch the procedure.
  • Many cases of separation anxiety are severe will take the help of a professional trainer or veterinarian to resolve.

Positive Alternative

  • Dog daycare-an excellent resource for teaching the dog that he can have a great time in your absence and you will return to pick him up.  The dog will return home exercised and will be able to remain calm for a longer period of time.

Remember:

  • Regardless of the reason your dog barks, all dogs need regular exercise.
  • Don’t punish after the fact-if you don’t catch the dog in the act of barking, the effectiveness of any correction is lost.
  • Enlist the help of a friend or neighbor to assess the length of time the dog barks, when and if the reason can be found.

Teach Your Dog to Roll Over

Get your dog to lay down in front of you. Once he is down, encourage him to go to a hip (whichever side your dog favors).  Now take a treat, show it to your dog. Keep the treat close to your dog’s nose and move the treat slowly over the dog’s shoulder towards his backbone. Your dog should turn his head to follow the treat. At first you may have to place your other hand on your dog’s back to prevent him from standing up.

The further back you move the treat, the more your dog should twist his neck to follow the treat.  If the neck twists far enough, the body will follow.  Once his legs are in the air, continue using the treat to lure him all the way over.  Remember to label the command with one word such as ‘over’ or ‘rollover’. Be consistent with the command you give every time you work with your dog on roll over. Until your dog knows what is expected by the command, only say it as the dog is doing the trick. Always give him the treat when he is all the way over.

With practice, your dog will no longer need you to lure him all the way over. You will be able to say your command and make a rolling signal with your index finger to cue your dog to roll over.

Summer Shedding

Summer heat means, your dogs and cats are shedding. While you might be annoyed at the extra hairball tumble weeds on your floor, remember that all that loose hair isn’t good for your pet. Dogs and cats require a minimum of weekly brushing year round, even if they are indoors. Long haired cats and dogs may require daily brushing.

The best products I’ve found to help me manage my dog and cats’ shedding are the Furminator products.

Furminator makes stainless steel blade brushes in many varieties to fit every coat length and type. The brushes are very effective at removing not only the top coat, but also the loose undercoat that can cause matting if left on your pet. The brush blades are well made and don’t scratch your pets skin or pull on their fur. I’ve found that brushing my dog and cats with the Furminator brush twice a week really controls my pets’ shedding.

Furminator also makes many waterless sprays that aid in the effectiveness of brushing.. I’m going to tell you my two favorites.

The first one is for cats. I’ve been using Furminator Hairball Prevention spray on my cats for years. It helps reduce shedding and prevents hairballs in cats without having to bathe them. The spray contains Omega 3 Fatty Acids and other natural ingredients that help keep my cats fur shiny and healthy looking.

The second spray is for dogs. I use Furminator detangling waterless spray. My Shih-Tzu has curly fur that gets easily tangled between grooming appointments. This spray is very effective in loosening the tangles, so I can brush through it without pulling his fur. Like the Hairball Prevention spray, the detangling spray is made with Omega 3 Fatty Acids and other natural ingredients to promote healthy fur.

Furminator products will help you keep the excess hair off your dogs and cats so they can enjoy the summer with you. Happy brushing!!

How to Stop Your Puppy from Chewing

1) Puppy-proof your home. Instead of constantly reprimanding a young puppy for getting into things, puppy-proof any areas of the house to which your puppy will be given access, in much the same way one would child-proof an area for a baby:
 

  • Temporarily take up any throw rugs.

  •   Place all plants, poisonous substances, household cleaners, trash receptacles, paper products (such as tissue and toilet paper), shoes, and any small chewable objects out of reach.

  •   Remove, cover or tape down all accessible electrical wires.

  •   Remove or secure heavy objects which could fall or be pulled down and cause injury to the puppy.

2) Limit the number of toys. While all dogs should have toys to play with, the problem with providing your dog with too many toys is that it makes it more difficult for the dog to differentiate what’s his from what’s yours. Do not provide a destructive puppy with more than a few toys at a time.  Rotating your dog’s toys will keep the toys new and exciting to your dog, so he would go looking for new toys.

If your dog is chewing on soft items such as sofa cushions or pillows, do not give your dog any plush toys.  Plush dog toys with squeakers, often increase your dog’s prey drive, making them want to destroy and get the squeaker out.  Once the dog has destroyed his toys he will go looking for something else to “kill”.

3) Safely confine your puppy. Use a suitably sized crate or wire-reinforced puppy gate whenever you’re unable to safely supervise him. When introduced properly and used correctly, crate training is a safe, preventive, effective and humane housetraining tool, which provides the puppy with a secure, protective den, while offering his owner peace of mind. Please note: Introduce your dog to his new crate using positive association and never use his crate as a punishment.


4) Offer him lots of outdoor exercise. Dogs that are destructive indoors need one to two hours of active outdoor exercise daily, provided they are fully immunized. Teaching your dog to retrieve a ball, toy, or Frisbee will help cure his chronic chewing problem.

Dog Rearing: The Essentials

Attention, Exercise, and Mental Stimulation

Dogs need social interaction, physical exercise, and mental stimulation – just like children do – in order to grow up to be healthy and well adjusted.  When these needs are not met, many behaviour problems can develop. 

Attention:

How much daily social time does a dog need? A good rule of thumb is that a dog should spend at least half his waking hours each day interacting with other dogs and people.  Like humans, most dogs enjoy a mix of old friends and new encounters – so make sure your pup meets at least one new dog or person each day.   While dogs do need to learn to spend time alone, too much isolation will make them antisocial, anxious or depressed.  Allowing your dog regular access to his familiar doggie buddies as well as the chance to meet new dogs will increase the chances of him being socially content and well adjusted. 

Physical Exercise & Mental Stimulation:

Your dog’s brain and body BOTH need lots of exercise. Swimming, playing tug & fetch, and playing with other dogs are good brain AND body work-outs.  Walks on leash are not always physically exerting, but they do provide a lot of mental stimulation: all the outdoor smells, sights and sounds are very interesting!  Working on obedience skills requires lots of doggy concentration, and your dog will love the mental challenge of figuring out new things.   Make sure you exercise your dog’s brain AND body each day.